Today’s Webinar

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For additional information on our panelists or to read their publications, please visit their faculty website:

Dr. Marcelle Haddix |  Syracuse University

  • Haddix, M. (2015). Preparing community-engaged teachers. Theory Into Practice, 54(1), 63– 70.
  • Haddix, M. (2014). Preparing teachers to teach “other people’s children” while homeschooling your own: One black woman scholar’s story. In P. Martens & B. Kabuto (Eds.), Learning from and with children: Insights and reflections from parent- researchers. New York, NY: Taylor & Francis.
  • Haddix, M. (2013). Creating spaces for Black girlhood through hip-hop feminist pedagogy. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 57(1), 78-80.

Dr. Dafina-Lazarus (D-L) Stewart | Bowling Green State University

  • Stewart, D.-L. (2016). Invention and representation: Crafting an online scholarly identity. In M. Gasman (Ed.), Academics going public: How to speak and write beyond academe [Kindle edition available]. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Stewart, D.-L., Brazelton, G. B., Renn, K. A. (Eds.). (2015). Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans*, and queer students in higher education: An appreciative inquiry. New Directions for Student Services, no. 152. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Stewart, D. L. (2015). Know your role: Black college students, racial identity, and performance. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 28(2), 238-258. [published first online, May 2014]. DOI: 10.1080/09518398.2014.916000

Dr. Chezare A. Warren | Michigan State University

  • Warren, C. A., Douglas, T. R. M., & Howard, T. C. (2016). In Their Own Words: Erasing Deficits and Exploring What Works to Improve K–12 and Postsecondary Black Male School Achievement. Teachers College Record, 118(6), n6.
  • Warren, C. A. (2016). “We Learn Through Our Struggles”: Nuancing Notions of Urban Black Male Academic Preparation for Postsecondary Success. Teachers College Record, 118, 060307.
  • Warren, C. A., & Hotchkins, B. K. (2015). Teacher Education and the Enduring Significance of “False Empathy”. The Urban Review, 47(2), 266-292.

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